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Can Your Boss Help You Get Through Covid-19?

Well, not likely.But according to a new study, the right kind of boss can help reduce stress, and increase engagement and pro-social behavior in their workers who were anxious about COVID-19, according to newswise.com. “A global pandemic can lead some people to think about their own mortality, which will understandably make them more stressed and less engaged at work,” the web site quotes Jia (Jasmine) Hu, lead author of the study and associate professor of management and human resources at The Ohio State University’s Fisher College of Business.  “But business leaders who are attentive to employees’ emotional needs and unite them behind a common purpose made a positive difference and helped workers stay engaged at work and contribute to their communities.” Several studies verified this.  One study involved 163 workers at an information technology company in eastern China who filled out surveys twice a day over three weeks while cases of COVID-19 were surging in the country. "Resu…

CEOs Have It Good, Except for Lifespans

It's not at all surprising but a new study has found that, if you're a CEO, you might not live as long as your mailboy.That's because, duh, job stress takes a big toll on your lifespan, according to newswise.com.The web site gives as an example, James Donald, CEO, of Starbucks from 2005 to 2008.  In those three short years, he went from looking his age of 50, with dark hair and "just a hint of crow’s feet around his eyes. By the time he left after the financial crisis of 2007–2008, however, his hair was grey, and his eyes and forehead were deeply lined with wrinkles. According to machine-learning analysis, he looked more than five years older than his actual age," newswise reports.“It’s very clear that living through this crisis led to significantly faster aging,” the web site quotes Ulrike Malmendier, Berkeley Haas’ Edward J. and Mollie Arnold Professor of Finance. Photographic analysis of Donald and other CEOs living through the financial crash is just one way …

Taking Common Pain Relievers? They May Make you Bungee Jump off a Tall Bridge

Common pain relievers. They're what we use for headaches,cramps, muscle pulls.  But what if they can also cause us danger?  A new report says using them can alter our perception of risk, according to newswise.com.While acetaminophen is helping you deal with your headache, it may also be making you more willing to take risks, a new study suggests. "People who took acetaminophen rated activities like 'bungee jumping off a tall bridge' and 'speaking your mind about an unpopular issue in a meeting at work' as less risky than people who took a placebo, researchers found," newswise explains. The website adds that use of the drug also led people to take more risks in an experiment where they could earn rewards by inflating a virtual balloon on a computer: Sometimes they went too far and the balloon popped. “Acetaminophen seems to make people feel less negative emotion when they consider risky activities – they just don’t feel as scared,” newswise quotes Baldwin …

Are You Optimistic? Chances Are, You Are, For Life

It's kind of hard to believe right now but a new study has found that humans are, well, optimistic, for most of life, according to newswise.com.Logically you would think the happiest time of your life would be when you're young, and everything lies ahead of you.  But that's a time of discomfort and anxiety and sometimes panic as you find your way.Then it was said that the elderly are the happiest because, even though they're at the end of their lives, they're not fighting and competing like they did when they were younger.  They pretty much let everything go.Researchers from Michigan State University led the largest study of its kind to determine how optimistic people are in life and when, as well as how major life events affect how optimistic they are about the future, the website reports.But, “We found that optimism continued to increase throughout young adulthood, seemed to steadily plateau and then decline into older adulthood,” newswise quotes William Chopik, …

Going for an Interview? Don't Do It Virtually

As if we didn't have enough to worry about, now experts are saying that job candidates who interview virtually are less likely to get the job.Thanks so much.  In a time when face-to-face interaction is discouraged, this is very, well, discouraging."New research provides some of the first solid evidence that people who watch a virtual job interview rate the candidate substantially lower than those who watch the same interview in person," newswise.com reports.According to CNBC, the COVID-19 pandemic has caused as many as 8 out of 10 recruiters to turn to videoconferencing to screen and interview job candidates. This conveys a shift in hiring practices that may continue long after the pandemic’s impact wears off.
"With this trend, employers and job applicants may wonder how interviews conducted through Zoom, or other video-mediated communication (VMC) platforms, hold up when compared to face-to-face sessions," newswise quotes Dr. Denise Baker, who worked on the pro…

Women: Think You'll Get Paid for College Internships? Think Again

This probably won't come as a surprise to anyone but women are less likely to receive pay for internships than men.According to newswise.com, the odds of women receiving pay for a college internship are 34% lower than for men, claims new research from Binghamton University, State University of New York."A team of researchers led by Binghamton University Assistant Professor of Student Affairs Administration John Zilvinskis sought to find out whether women and other under-served groups were more or less likely to participate in paid or unpaid internships in college compared with their peers," newswise says. This issue was examined because paid internships often lead to higher paying positions post-graduation and that women continue to earn less than men for the same position despite their level of education.Of the 2,410 seniors who participated in internships, 58% of men received pay during their internships, whereas only 35% of women received pay. “This finding aligns wit…

A Light in the Darkness

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Opinion: Appreciating small gestures in dark times By Deborah DiSesa Hirsch Updated 8:03 am EDT, Sunday, June 14, 2020
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